Kurt und Ursula Schubert Archiv


Search Results:

Concept for a Virtual Museum of Professor Kurt Schubert’s Jewish History as the Site of Jewish Identity

This position paper by Dr. Bernhard Dolna contains the concept of a virtual exhibition, which was not implemented however. At its heart would be Professor Kurt Schubert’s work: Jewish History as the Site of Jewish Identity. Note: manuscript in the collection.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Death and Resurrection in Early Jewish and Early Christian Art

The development of a Jewish concept of resurrection: there is no concept of universal resurrection in the Old Testament, nor in Middle Eastern Antiquity generally. It is only the Greek trichotomic concept of a soul that makes the belief in resurrection possible. It is on this basis that the idea of the reuniting of body and soul begins to develop in the second century BC.

 

Discussion of the representation of Ezekiel, Chapter 37 in the Synagogue of Dura Europos, mid 3rd century A.D. The scene of the revivification.

 

Shows the methodological emphasis: analysis of the picture, as compared to the Bible text and to Rabbinic literature.

 

The fifth picture shows Greek Psyche figures with butterfly wings and indicates the infiltration of a late antique concept of creation and resurrection into Jewish thought. This is echoed in the writings of Josephus Flavius.

 

For comparison, Kurt Weitzmann’s analysis of the Prometheus Sarcophagus is used, the iconography of which also highlights trichotomic anthropology.

 

Trichotomic anthropology also exerts its influence on early Christian perception, as in Paul or Irenaeus, and on early Christian iconography, the creation of Eva in the so-called Trinity Sarcophagus, (the Dogmatic Sarcophagus, beginning of the 4th century and later in the hexaemeron cupola of San Marco, Venice, where the iconography harks back to the Cotton Genesis, Byzantium, 5th century. This late influence jars slightly with the fact that the teaching of trichotomy had been condemned in the Council of Rome (382).

 

The belief in an in-between stage between death and the Last Days develops in Judaism, as well as in Christianity. In late antique art this belief can be seen in the representations of Jonah sleeping under the gourd, relating to the classical iconography of the sleeping Endymion (Jonah Sarcophagus).

 

The concept of salvation in Old Testament iconography in late antique catacomb painting: in Christian catacombs this is expressed through a great number of scenes showing redemption or salvation. These scenes convey the hope of eschatological salvation. Closely related to this is the image of the Good Shepherd as Saviour, as taken from Roman culture. Believers are entitled to eschatological redemption through baptism and the Eucharist. Therefore the representations of baptism, the multiplication of the loaves, and ritual meals are frequently found in the catacomb paintings.

 

The counterpart in Jewish catacombs is seen in temple imagery referring to the eschatological third temple: The Jewish Catacomb Villa Torlonia.

 

Representations of Jesus: in the earliest catacomb paintings there is still no representation of the person of Jesus, with respect to Canon 36 of the Synod of Elvira, beginning of the fourth century. During this period, however, the figure of a youthful philosopher is occasionally depicted. After the fourth century Jesus appears in scenes of the resurrection of Lazarus, as conqueror over death, a thought closely linked to the theology of victory of the Roman emperors. The early representations of the passion distance themselves clearly from the crucifixion and from the suffering Jesus, (sarcophagus of Junius Bassus).

 

The Cross appears as the symbol of victory, of the Last Judgement and of the resurrection, (crux gemmata, Apses of Santa Pudenziana and Santi Cosma e Damiano)

 

Resurrection and ascension to God: this theme illustrates the close relationship between Jewish and Christian art. Moses’ ascent of Mount Sinai, (Byzantine manuscript, tenth century, or the mosaics of Santa Katharina Basilica, Sinai) is associated with the resurrection of Christ (Munich ivory from the year 400).

 

A central theme of early Christian and Jewish art is the representation of God. We do not find an anthropomorphic representation of God. God’s intervention is shown through images of God’s hand (Dura Europos Synagogue, Munich ivory).

 

The image of the ascension in the old Syriac Rabbula Gospel from the year 586 referring to the visions of Ezekiel can be set by side these early Christian representations. Here the figure of Christ rising in the radiance of a rainbow can be compared to the representations of the returning victorious emperors. Thus it transpires that the early Christian illustrations of the passion and resurrection are first and foremost about victory over death (Rabbula Codex, Ascension to Heaven).

 

Further sources can be found in: Kurt Schubert, Die Entwicklung der Auferstehungslehre von der nachexilischen bis zur frührabbinischen Zeit (The Development of the Teaching on Resurrection from post-exile to early Rabbinic times), BZ 6, 1962, p. 177-214.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here:

phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:526664


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Development and Significance of the Jewish Diaspora

In this collection Professor Kurt Schubert addresses the issue of Jewish exile. Attached are notes about a medieval Passover Haggada (the Passover narration).


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Development of the term of the ‘resurrection’

Here Professor Kurt Schubert addresses the concept of resurrection in various Bible texts, as well as in Rabbinic texts and offers a view of Christianity with the resurrection of Jesus.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Ehrung der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zum 80. Geburtstag von Professor Kurt Schubert

Diese Ehrung der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften erhielt Professor Kurt Schubert anlässlich seines achtzigsten Geburtstags am 4. März 2003.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Einladung Namensgebung des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Die Einladung zur Namensgebung des Zentrums findet sich in tschechischer und deutscher Sprache und verweißt auf die Veranstaltung am 13. Oktober 2008.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Einladung zum Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreis 2010

Die Einladung zur ersten Verleihung des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreises 2010 enthält ein Programm, sowie Informationen zum ersten Preisträger Hofrat Marko Feingold.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Einladung zum Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreis 2012

Die Einladung zur zweiten Verleihung des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreises 2012 enthält ein Programm, sowie Informationen zum Preisträger Bürgermeister a.D. Alfred Stingl.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Einladung zum Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreis 2014

Die Einladung zur dritten Verleihung des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreises 2014 enthält ein detailliertes Programm, sowie Informationen zu den Preisträgern: das Religionstheologische Institut St. Gabriel und sein Gründer und Leiter Prof. Dr. Andreas Bsteh SVD.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Einladung zum Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreis 2016

Die Einladung zur vierten Verleihung des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreises 2016 enthält ein Programm, sowie Informationen zu den Preisträgerinnen Professorin Irmgard Aschbauer und Mag.a Ruth Steiner.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Einladung: Übergabe Kurt und Ursula Schubert-Archiv und Buchpräsentation "Erlebte Geschichte"

Die Übergabe des Kurt und Ursula Schubert-Archives gemeinsam mit der Buchpräsentation fand am 20. März 2017 statt. Die dazugehörige Einladung gibt Informationen zur Veranstaltung.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Englisches Logo des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Hier findet sich die Logos des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz in englischer Sprache.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Figural Jewish Art in Antiquity

In this collection Professor Kurt Schubert analyses various examples of figural Jewish art, using numerous biblical quotations and the frescoes from Pompeii.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Forty Years of Jewish Studies at the University of Vienna

This E-book consists of the invitation and programme of the fortieth anniversary of the Institute for Jewish Studies at the University of Vienna and the laudation given by University Professor Dr. Dr. Johann Maier. The celebration took place on 22 May 2006 in the small hall of the University of Vienna.


License

CC BY-ND 4.0 International

Forty Years of the State of Israel, Historical Background to the Middle East Conflict

The first part of the notes deals with the history of Israel. With a short introduction, Professor Kurt Schubert discusses Israel from the beginning of its founding. The second part was given as a lecture at the Brigittenau Community College on 30 May, 1970 and considers the conflict in the Middle East.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Foto: Begrüßung Professorin Ingeborg Fialova am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacky Universität Olmütz

Prof. Ingeborg Fialova, die Initiatorin der Olmützer Judaistik, begrüsst die Gäste anlässlich der Eröffnung der neuen Räume des „Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrums für Jüdische Studien“ an der Palacký Universität Olmütz, Februar 2010.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Foto: Hofrat Marko Feingold - Preisträger bei der Verleihung des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreis 2010

Dieses Foto zeigt den Preisträger Hofrat Marko Feingold bei der Verleihung des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreis 2010.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Foto: Hofrat Marko Feingold - Preisträger des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreises 2010, bei der Preisverleihung

Dieses Foto zeigt den Preisträger Hofrat Marko Feingold bei der Verleihung des Kurt Schubert Gedächtnispreises 2010. Links neben ihm Univ.-Prof. Dr. Sigrid Jalkotzy-Deger, Vizepräsidentin der ÖAW, rechts Hofrat Feingolds Gattin.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Foto: Hörsaal des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien

Dieses Foto zeigt den grossen Hörsaal am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz, 2012; links ein Teil der Kurt Schubert Bibliothek (Prof. Schuberts private Fachbibliothek, die Eva Schubert nach dem Tod ihres Vaters dem Olmützer Institut schenkte).


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Foto: Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacky Universität Olmütz im Frühjahr 2014

Diese Aufnahme wurde im Frühjahr 2014, anlässlich eines Besuches der Tochter und Enkelin von Kurt und Ursula Schubert, aufgenommen und zeigt das Team des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrums für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz.

Hinten, stehend, von links nach rechts: Eva Schubert (Tochter von Kurt und Ursula Schubert); Mag. Louise Hecht, PhD., Assistant; Mgr. Ivana Cahova, Head of the Department (mit Sohn; Franziska Wibmer mit Tochter Laura (Enkelin und Urenkelin von Kurt und Ursula Schubert); Prof. Ingeborg Fialova (Professorin für Germanistik und Initiatorin der Olmützer Judaistik);

Vorne, hockend bzw. kniend, von links nach rechts: Mgr. Marie Crhova, Phd., Assistant, PhDr. Lenka Ulicna, PhD., Assistant; Doc. Tamas Visi, M.A., Guarantor of the Jewish and Israeli Studies Study Field.

 


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

No Results