Kurt und Ursula Schubert Archiv


Search Results:
Art as the Carrier of Tradition and Memory (Neuwaldegg 11.11.1991)
At the end of the memorial day of ‘Kristallnacht’ The Holy Days of Passover and Purim in particular are concerned with memory and commemoration The Biblical covenant with God and the hope of the arrival of the Messiah enables Jews to withstand persecution Passover, Purim and the covenant are themes found in Jewish art Passover: the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt: the Dura Europos Synagogue; Bird’s Head Haggadah: the exodus from Egypt and the persecution from the Pharaoh’s army (with reference to Rudolf von Habsburg’s persecution of R. Meir of Rothenburg); Sephardi Haggadot (British Library, Or. 2737, Sarajevo Haggadah); printed Haggadot (Venetian Haggadah) Purim: Kaniel Megilla: the story of Esther The covenant with God: Dura Europos Synagogue – Binding of Isaac; the Beth Alpha Synagogue – Binding of Isaac; the Bird’s Head Haggadah – The Giving of the Law on Sinai; Dresdner Mahzor: Giving of the Law on Sinai; the Regensburg Pentateuch – Binding of Isaac, the Giving of the Law on Mount Sinai Eschatological Scenes: Bird’s Head Haggada – Garden of Eden and the heavenly Jerusalem; Sarajevo Haggadah – the heavenly temple; the Second Nurnberg Haggadah – Elias (see also the Mantua Haggadah) These themes also appear in the the illustration of modern Haggadot (Siegmund Ascher Forst, 1949) (Translator: Joan Avery) The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525996

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Assimilation tendencies from the 3rd to the 18th century (Conference: The problem of Jewish Identity from antiquity to the present)
The problem of Jewish figurative art: Pictures to the Bible http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472253 Beginning of Jewish figurative art in the Dura Europos Synagogue: Representation of Ezekiel’s vision of the resurrection of the dead under the influence of Roman-Greek trichotomic anthropology (man consisting of soma, pneuma and psyche) After an interruption of several centuries figurative art reappears in Judaism in the 13th century, some of its themes influenced by Christian art, others independent thereof: (representations of Jewish traditions; topics induced by anti-Christian polemics). Arba’a Turim from Mantua, Italy, 15th century (Vatican, cod. Ross 555, fol. 220r): Depiction of a wedding scene to illustrate a text section about marriage law. The illustration comes from a Christian painter and reflects the fact that Jews shared the taste of those in their Christian environment. Italian Psalter in Parma (Biblioteca palatina, MS Parm3236, fol. 2r): margin illustration with putti and birds and an initial panel with a bust portrait of David. Last quarter of the 15th century: introduction of the Hebrew printing press first in Italy (Soncino). The margin ornamentations come from the surrounding culture (vines, putti, wild animals). In addition to these samples of contemporary taste in marginal ornaments one can also see the practice of figurative art in the wood block picture Bible of Moses dal Castellazzo (Venice, 1521). Dal Castellazzo used Christian Bibles with wood blocks as models (Cologne Bible, block books, Schedel’s Chronicle of the World), as well as older Christian manuscripts. During the 16th century the printed medium was also used for the production of illustrated Haggadot (Mantua Haggadah, 1560, Venetian Haggadah, 1609). These also reflect the taste of the Christian surroundings. During the 16th century Jewish culture is stronger in Italy than to the North of the Alps, where Prague Haggadah was printed in 1526. These early modern woodblock Haggadot use medieval models from Jewish book illustrations and bring them together with elements (mainly ornamental) of the surrounding Renaissance culture. From the beginning of the 17th century the cultural centre for Jewish book illumination moved to Amsterdam. This is where the 1690 Amsterdam copper plate engraving Haggadah was produced, using Matthias Merian’s 1627 copper plate engraving Bible as a model. It became particularly popular within the Christian community. The ornamentation of the Amsterdam Haggadah uses biblical scenes, relevant to the order of the Haggadah. The ritual scenes however convey biblical compositions and translate them into illustrations of Jewish rituals. In a second edition (1712) the repertoire of depictions of rituals was even extended. Baroque manuscripts: see ("Jewish Baroque illustration") http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484 and ("Jewish Baroque Illumination") http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474519 (Translator: Joan Avery) The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525995

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Austrian Contribution to the Research of Jewish Art
First publication on Jewish art appeared in Vienna (by Schlosser and Müller with their publication of the Sarajevo Haggadah, 1898): the forerunner to this area of research Short outline of the research that followed in Germany and archeological excavations in Israel In the Post War period the Vienna Institute for Jewish Studies was turned into a centre for those interested in Jewish art. The initial impulse was the discovery of the Old Testament frescoes in the Roman Catacombs of the Via Latina, where the iconography contains many Rabbinic elements (Kurt Schubert) The methods for interpreting early Christian art in the light of rabbinic literature was then used for further works (Ashburnham Pentateuch, Vienna Genesis), which Schubert and his team worked on (Günter Stemberger, Su-Min Andreas Ri), and especially Ursula Schubert herself with the exhibition Spätantikes Judentum und frühchristliche Kunst, Late Antique Judaism and Early Christian Art) At the same time Schubert and his team began to take interest in illuminated Hebrew manuscripts from the Middle Ages. This interest led to an extensive collection of pictures on Hebrew book illumination towards the end of the 1970s. In 1982 the Jewish Museum in Eisenstadt was opened. The following is an outline of the relationships between late antique Jewish and early Christian art as well as examples of medieval Jewish book illumination (publication of Jüdische Buchkunst [Jewish Book Art] 1984). Some projects were worked on by colleagues or doctoral students (Katrin Kogman-Appel in a dissertation on the Second Nurnberg Haggadah, Felicitas Heimann in a dissertation on the Second Darmstadt Haggadah). Schubert’s interest in the elements of anti-Christian polemics in Jewish art In the 1980s an exhibition was held in the Jewish Museum of Eisenstadt on Court Jews; the preparations for it awakened a new interest in Baroque book illumination (Jüdische Buchmalerei II, Jewish Book Illumination II, 1992), [see http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484] The work of the curator Felicitas Heimann-Jelinek could be seen in several Jewish museums During the 1980s: work on the Moses dal Castellazzo project and publication of a facsimile edition 1992: Symposium Jüdische Wurzeln frühchristlicher Kunst, The Jewish Roots of Early Christian Art (Translator: Joan Avery)

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bible Images in Judaism (Celle, Hannover 1990)
1898: The Sarajevo Haggadah becomes known (Aragon, 14th century, Sarajevo National Museum of Bosnia Herzegovina) – first appraisal of Jewish pictorial art hitherto unknown 1932: Discovery of the Synagogue of Dura Europos, 244 AD. Marginalisation of Jewish pictorial art in research both into Judaism because of the prohibition of images and also into art history due to the remote location of Dura Europos at the Eastern frontier of the Roman Empire. Discussion of the prohibition to create images from the Bible to rabbinic literature; prior to the Second World War the prevailing assumption was that there were non-rabbinic marginal groups favouring art, whereas ‘normative’ Jewry was iconophobic New approaches in research after the Second World War: late antique examples and medieval manuscripts could be covered relatively quickly, whereas the manuscripts from the Baroque period still needed pioneer work. Discussion of various examples from the synagogue at Dura Europos: the finding of the infant Moses and the resurrection from the dead in the Ezekiel story (see the lecture Death and Resurrection) Mid sixth century saw a strengthening of Jewish national awareness: abandoning the Greek language, putting the synagogue liturgy into Hebrew during which pictorial language was harshly rejected. Only in the 13th century was there another blossoming of figural art within the context of urban culture. Jewish artists could use the techniques of book illumination for urban scriptoria. Three groups of medieval manuscripts: Ashkenazi: German Lands and Northern France Sephardi: Iberia and Southern France Italy In the Ashkenazi there is a clear divide between Jewish book art and its Christian surroundings. The literature of Jewish commentaries plays a big role in its iconography. This art is defined by a strong coyness of the human figure: at least the faces of the figures are covered (Genesis Initials, Ashkenazi Bible of the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, Würzburg 1236-38) or they are replaced by animal heads (Giving of the Law, Bird’s Head Haggadah in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Rhineland, approximately 1300, eschatological scenes in the Ashkenazi Bible of the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan); the heads remain without facial features.1 Short discussion of the micrography (the representation of Jonah in the British Library, MS Add. 21160, Bible circa 1300). Regensburg Pentateuch (Israel Museum): Biblical scenes with full human representations. The scenes are strongly influenced by Rabbinic commentary literature (the circumcision of Isaac, the binding of Isaac). Ashkenazi Haggadah illustration of the 15th century as a further central genre of Hebrew book illumination: the Second Nurnberg Haggadah (London, David Sofer Collection, formerly the Schocken Library): The Wise Men of Bne Braq, a topic mentioned in the text of the Haggadah. The text illustrations in this manuscript run parallel to a continuous, chronologically arranged Bible cycle (Finding of the infant Moses). As is common in Ashkenazi Haggadah illustration, the images appear as unframed drawings on the margins of the pages. The Biblical illustrations are heavily influenced by Rabbinic commentary literature. In Iberia the Haggadah has a blossoming in the fourteenth century with a different character, for instance the Golden Haggadah (British Library, Barcelona, circa 1320). This tradition is strongly influenced by Christian art on the one hand, as well as by Rabbinic literature (The building of the tower of Babel, Abraham in the fiery furnace of Nimrod), Sarajevo Haggadah (the banquet of Josef) Italian manuscript illustration is particularly influenced by Christian art: Parma Psalter, 13th century (Psalm 138: By the Waters of Babylon): Parma Pentateuch, 15th century ( beginning of Deuteronomy: Moses speaks to the Israelites). The Picture Bible of Moses dal Castellazzo, Venice: copy of a wood cut picture Bible from the late 15th century (formerly Warsaw, Hist. Inst, now lost): Biblical Passover celebration (the only scene for which an original wood cut has been preserved). All pictures have Hebrew and Italian titles. The Castellazzo Bible is also strongly influenced by Rabbinic literature, as are other Jewish illustration traditions (spies from the Holy Land). In Italy, where Jews from different communities encountered each other, the Ashkenazi and the Sephardi pictorial traditions met and influenced each other. From the 16th century on Haggadot were published in Italy: Haggadah from Mantua (1560, slavery in Egypt, miraculous multiplication of the people of Israel – borrowed from Rabbinic literature; Haggadah from Venice (1609, title page). The Haggadah from Venice appeared during a period of blossoming of Italian printing, which begins to fade at the end of the 16th century. Later the main focus of book production moved North, where in the Jewish context the Amsterdam Haggadah was important. The Haggadah with copper engravings was produced by the convert Abraham bar Jacob, who used the sequence of copper engravings from Matthew Merian the Elder as a model (the snake miracle). In the 18th century there is a revival of Hebrew book art, particularly in Bohemia and Moravia, but also in other places, especially in the field of the Haggadah illustrations. The commissioners are court Jews, merchants and bankers. The book art craft had survived, as Torah rolls had to be, and still have to be, written by hand. Among the producers of such manuscripts were: Joseph ben David from Leipnitz (Moravia), Uri Feibusch Isaak Segal from Altona, Juda Löw ben Elija Hakohen from Leszno. Contrary to the medieval tradition, these illustrations are no longer influenced by Rabbinic commentary literature and therefore open the way to a modern Jewish art of painting. (Translator: Joan Avery) The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:524551

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bible Images in Judaism (Prague, 12. 9. 1995)
Siehe: Jüdische Kunst der Antike http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472616 Bilder zur Bibel im Judentum http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472253

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Bernhard Dolna und Katrin Kogman Appel beim Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Die Vortragenden Dr. Bernhard Dolna und Professorin Katrin Kogman Appel, welche den Hauptvortrag „Zwischen Jüdischer Tradition und Frühchristlicher Kunst. Die Malereien in der Katakombe der Via Latina in derForschung von Ursula und Kurt Schubert“ hielten. Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Die Leiterin des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrums für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz Mag. Ivana Cahová (erste Reihe, links) beim Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Neben ihr Dr. Louise Hecht (ebenfalls Olmütz) und Dr. Vladimir Levin, Direktor des Zentrums für Jüdische Kunst an der Hebräischen Universität Jerusalem. Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Dieses Bild zeigt den gut besuchten Großen Festsaal der der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften anlässlich des Festvortrages für Kurt und Ursula Schubert. Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Dr. Bernhard Dolna, dahinter, von links nach rechts: Prof. Günther Stemberger, Dr. Brigitte Stemberger, Prof. Gerhard Langer Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Dieses Bild zeigt den Grossen Festsaal während des Festvortrages, mit Blick aufs Rednerpodium. Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Vortragender Rektor Heinz W. Engel (Einleitende Worte) Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Vortragende Dr. Brigitte Stemberger (Moderation) Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Vortragender Anton Zeillinger (Begrüßung) Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Das Bild zeigt die Mutter der Vortragenden Prof. Katrin Kogman-Appel im Gespräch mit Pater Augustinus Wucherer; rechts Dr. Vladimir Levin (Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University Jerusalem), Kerstin Appel (Berlin, ehem. Schubert-Schülerin) und Eva Schubert (von hinten). Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Empfang im Atelier der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften nach dem Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016. Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Vortragender Dr. Vladimir Levin (Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University Jerusalem) Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Vortragende Dr. Bernhard Dolna und Professorin Katrin Kogman Appel. Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Vortragende Dr. Bernhard Dolna und Professorin Katrin Kogman Appel. Timeline® /Rudi Handl

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 20. Jänner an der Palacký Universität Olmütz
Dieses Bild zeigt den Festsaal (ehem. Kapelle) des im ehem. Jesuitencollege untergebrachten Kunstzentrums der Palacký Universität während des Festvortrages, mit Blick aufs Rednerpodium.

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Bild: Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 20. Jänner an der Palacký Universität Olmütz
Vortragender Dr. Vladimir Levin (Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University Jerusalem)

License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

No Results