Kurt und Ursula Schubert Archiv


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Jewish Figural Art from the 3d to the 18th century (Graz, 1992)
Siehe: Bilder zur Bibel im Judentum http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472253

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Jewish Figurative Art from the 3rd to the 18th Centuries
Turku, Finnland 1990, Jerusalem 1994 Siehe: Bilder zu Bibel http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472253 Drei Vorträge an der Humboldt Universität, Berlin http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472446 Für den ersten Teil: Jüdische Kunst der Antike (Basel 1983) http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472616 Jüdische Buchmalerei im mittelalterlichen Deutschland http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472633 Jüdische figürliche Kunst vom 3.-18. Jahrhundert (Graz, 1992) http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472800 Jüdische Barockillustrationen in österreichischen Handschriften des 18. Jhts. http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484

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Jewish History as the site of Jewish Identity
The fragment of the unpublished work Jewish History as the Site of Jewish Identity by Professor Kurt Schubert consists of six completed chapters of the originally planned fourteen, the project having been cut short by his death in 2007. It deals with Jewish identity in Antiquity. Professor Kurt Schubert examines the rise of monotheism in Judaism and discusses various passages of the Tanach in this regard. In the following chapters his observations stretch from the Hellenistic period to the first century after Christ. There are also handwritten notes on each chapter, including those of the unfinished parts of the book.

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Jewish Identity in the Shadow of the Holocaust
In these notes Professor Kurt Schubert sketches a historical overview of Jewish identity, with a modern historical emphasis; he then analyses the connection between Jewish identity and the Shoah.

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Jewish Messianism in the Old Testament Talmud and Midrash
In this collection of notes Professor Kurt Schubert tackles the topic of Messianism in the Tora, as well as in Rabbinic writings. The author discusses the varying text-based positions on this topic.

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Jewish Symbolism in art (Salzburg, Hungary, 1988) Christian-Jewish Encounters in art (Eisenstadt, 1987) Jewish Art in Antiquity and its significance for early Christian art (Bavaria, 1990)
Detailed discussion of the biblical prohibition to create images in its various historical contexts. Starting from the biblical prohibition the lecture discusses Jewish visual culture against the background of the biblical approach. Representations already existed in the monuments built by Solomon (the lion sculptures, iron lake with 12 cattle) Contact with the pagan surroundings after the Babylonian exile (587 BC) led to an increased interest in their visual culture In the Roman empire the question becomes particularly acute (Caligula demands a placement of a statue of the emperor in the temple area; this order, in particular the Jewish reaction to it is documented by Josephus Flavius). In the context of the Greek-Roman culture, the Rabbinic authorities are seen as hostile towards images, whereas the elders of the synagogue are sympathetic. Polemics since the 2nd century AD as can be seen in Mekhilta de R. Yishmael (Ex. 20:23); Abhoda zara 3:1. From the third century onwards Rabbis are faced with this situation. (R. Johanan bar Nappaha in Jer. Abhoda zara 3:3) Idea of the In-Dwelling of God after the destruction of the temple to be found in the synagogues (Jer. Berakhot 5 8d, Bab. Megilla 29a): leads to the understanding that the Synagogue is no longer only a place to meet, but also a ‘holy space’ (inscriptions in Stobi, Tiberias, Gerasa and Na’aran). Dura Europos: Introduction with detailed analysis of the founder’s inscription, from which it becomes clear that the ‘presbyter’ of the Jewish community, Samuel bar Yedaya commissioned for the murals. Murals in the direct surroundings of the Torah shrine: temple topic; comparison with Tetradachma (Bar-Kokhba uprising, 132), Juxtaposition of the binding of Isaac, which according to Jewish tradition took place on the temple mountain (which can be equated with Mount Moriah). The central position of the temple theme is a clear indication of the understanding of the synagogue as a ‘holy place’. Destroyed murals above the Torah shrine. During the excavations these were still visible. Three different layers of paintings in this field point to the fact that the design kept changing during the eleven years of the synagogue’s existence of the painted synagogue. The lowest level: Torah as the tree of life, middle layer: Messianic Ruler figure (based on Gen. 49, Jacob blesses the 12 tribes and Jacob blesses Josef’s sons). This programme appears in between two representations of the Theophany: Moses at the burning bush and Moses on Mount Sinai. These pictures, together with the compositions in the middle pannel result in a Theophany programme, of which there are similar versions in the presbytery of San Vitale in Ravenna and in the basilica of Saint Katharine on Sinai. Schubert assumes that this programme was conceived of in a Jewish context. Iconography of the other walls reflects many midrashim: methodological debate with the influence of the midrashim on Jewish and Christian iconography (see above left). This lecture is partly based on earlier works: Christian-Jewish encounters in art (Eisenstadt) http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472218 Influence of Jewish painting on early Christian art http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472308 The Contribution of Jewish Studies to the Research of Early Christian Art (the significance of Jewish Sources for Early Christian Iconography).http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472342 the summary takes into account only the main extensions of topics discussed in other lectures. (Translator: Joan Avery) The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525991

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Jewish emancipation and Political Anti-Semitism in Austria
Here, Professor Kurt Schubert outlines the emancipation of Jews and Austrian anti-Semitism until the time of National Socialism.

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Jewish identify from the Babylonian Exile until the Present. Jewish History and Jewish Identity.
The material for the book project Jewish History as the Site of Jewish Identity contains notes for all the envisaged chapters. The project could not be completed because of Professor Kurt Schubert’s death in 2007. Beginning with Antiquity, the work would have also dealt with the Middle Ages, (i.e. Maimonides), Jewish art, as well as developments in the history of the modern era and present. The last chapter would have addressed the issue of Jewish identity in the period after the Second World War and the Shoah. Additional, but not uploaded material, includes Ursula Schubert’s article: What is Jewish in Jewish Visual Arts?, Kairos, 27, 1985, p. 269-278, as well as two pages by Kurt Schubert: The Religion of post-Biblical Judaism, Vienna, Herder, 1955, p. 187 ff. and 199. There are also edited letters: David Friedländer to Meier Eger (30 March 1799, Berlin) and Moses Moser to Immanuel Wohlwill (May, 1824). The first completed chapter of the book project can be found here: http://phaidra.univie.ac.at/o:438718

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Jewish-Christian Ecumenicism
The evolvement of the relationship between Jews and Christians in the modern period is sketched out here by Professor Kurt Schubert, with reference to Biblical themes.

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Judaism and Anti-Semitism in Austria
In keywords Professor Kurt Schubert’s notes sketch the history of Anti-Semitism in Austria throughout the ages.

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Judaism and Hellenism
In this material Professor Kurt Schubert discusses the relationship between Judaism and Hellenism; subjects such as assimilation, art and philosophy are analysed here, with examples of Jewish philosophers and the relationship between philosophy and the Tora.

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Judaism in Antiquity
In this little collection of notes Professor Kurt Schubert deals with developments during Antiquity. The Diaspora or the Book of Esther are discussed here, among other issues.

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Judaism: Self-perception and Misunderstanding
With several text examples Professor Kurt Schubert describes Jewish self-perception in Antiquity, using a copy of his work: Die Kultur der Juden I. Essen: Phaidon Verlag, 1988, which has not been uploaded for this E-book. This was for a lecture held on 21 March 1995 in Eisenstadt.

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Knowledge of Jewish Religious History as a Path to the Historical Jesus
In this material Professor Kurt Schubert describes the structure of Judaism at the time of Jesus, as well as its self-perception and the relationship to the religious parties.

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Kurt Schubert
1. Dezember 1995

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Kurt Schubert in seinem Arbeitszimmer
Ferstelgasse 6 in Wien, 1988

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Kurt Schubert und Clemens Thoma
Nach einem Vortrag, 1972

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Kurt Schubert und Norbert Höslinger
Kurt Schubert und Norbert Höslinger, Direktor des Katholischen Bibelwerkes, beim Königsbacher in der Walfischgasse, 2003

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Kurt Schubert vor dem Österreichischen Jüdischen Museum in Eisenstadt
Kurt Schubert, in Begleitung des schwarzen Zwergpudels „Theo“, sperrt das Eingangstor des Österreichischen Jüdischen Museums in Eisenstadt auf, Herbst 1985

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Kurt Schubert’s Foundations, Kurt and Ursula Schubert as Organisers and Partners
This list was put together as an insert for the address for Kurt and Ursula Schubert on 19 January 2016 in the grand hall of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. It consists of Professor Kurt Schubert’s foundations, as well as institutions relating to him and his wife, the art historian and Jewish Studies scholar Dr. Ursula Schubert.

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