Kurt und Ursula Schubert Archiv


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Invitation to the Ceremonial Address for Kurt and Ursula Schubert on 19 January 2016 in the Grand Hall of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

Die Einladung zum Festvortrag für Kurt und Ursula Schubert am 19. Jänner 2016 im Festsaal der österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften umfasst detaillierte Programmangaben zu den RednerInnen. Als Hauptvortrag wurde von Professorin Katrin Kogman Appel und Dr. Bernhard Dolna „Zwischen Jüdischer Tradition und Frühchristlicher Kunst. Die Malereien in der Katakombe der Via Latina in der Forschung von Ursula und Kurt Schubert“ gehalten.


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Invitation to the Ceremonial Address for Kurt and Ursula Schubert on 20 January at the Olmütz Palacky University

The invitation to the ceremonial address for Kurt and Ursula Schubert on 20 January 2016 at the Palacky University in Olmütz consists of detailed information about the speakers. The main lecture was given by Professor Katrin Kogman Appel and Dr. Bernhard Dolna: Between Jewish Tradition and Early Christian Art, The Via Latina Catacomb Paintings in Ursula and Kurt Schubert’s Research. The invitation is in Czech and the lectures were held in English.


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Invitation: Anniversary lecture of the Re-Opening of the University of Vienna

The invitation and the programme for the anniversary lecture on the occasion of the re-opening of the University of Vienna in May 1945 can be found in this E-book. The topic of Professor Kurt Schubert’s lecture was Zionism and Jewish Identity. The event took place on 2 May 2005.


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Jahresbericht 2010 des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Dieser Jahresbericht in Mailform dokumentiert die Entwicklungen und Ereignisse in Lehre und Forschung am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz im Jahr 2010.


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Jahresbericht 2011 des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Dieser Jahresbericht in englischer Sprache beschreibt die Entwicklungen und Ereignisse in Lehre und Forschung am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacky Universität Olmütz im Jahr 2011. Autorin des Berichtes ist Mgr. Ivana Cahova, Head of the Department.


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Jahresbericht 2012 / 2013 des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Dieser Jahresbericht in englischer Sprache beschreibt die Entwicklungen und Ereignisse in Lehre und Forschung am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz in den Jahren 2012 und 2013. Autorin des Berichts ist Mgr. Ivana Cahova, Head of the Department.


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Jahresbericht 2012 des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Dieser Jahresbericht in englischer Sprache beschreibt die Entwicklungen und Ereignisse in Lehre und Forschung am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz im Jahr 2012. Autorin des Berichts ist Mgr. Ivana Cahova, Head of the Department.


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Jahresbericht 2013 / 2014 des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Dieser Jahresbericht in englischer Sprache beschreibt die Entwicklungen und Ereignisse in Lehre und Forschung am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz in den Jahren 2013 und 2014. Autorin des Berichtes ist die interrimistische Leiterin des Instituts Mgr. Marie Crhova, Ph.D


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Jahresbericht 2014 / 2015 des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz

Dieser Jahresbericht in englischer Sprache beschreibt die Entwicklungen und Ereignisse in Lehre und Forschung am Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacky Universität Olmütz in den Jahren 2014 und 2015. Autorin des Berichtes ist die interrimistische Leiterin des Instituts Mgr. Marie Crhova, Ph.D


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Jesus and the Anti-Roman Rebels

In this fragment Professor Kurt Schubert discusses the various religious parties, the Jewish wars and their connection to Jesus. It is not known what the text was used for.


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Jesus in the Crossfire of Modern Criticism

In this collection of materials Professor Kurt Schubert discusses various theological positions of modern day authors with frequent recourse to Essenian themes.


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Jewish Art in Antiquity (Basel 1983)

The Biblical prohibition of images and the way it was applied in different cultural contexts (see lecture Bible Images in Judaism phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472253)

 

Introduction: Dura Europos Synagogue ( compare lecture Bible Images in Judaism)

 

Paintings around the Torah shrine: temple building, Lulav, Etrog, Menroah, narrative depiction of the binding of Isaac.

 

The central picture had been painted over several times and is therefore not well preserved. In the lower layers there were illustrations of the tree of life, David as the forerunner of the Messiah, the blessing of Jacob’s sons and the blessing of both of Joseph’s sons. These pictures are known from drawings, made by the excavators immediately after their uncovering.

 

Narrative representation on the Western Wall: the story of Esther

 

The Ezekiel Cycle (see Death and Resurrection lecture)

 

Connections to early Christian art (the catacombs of the Via Latina, the Vienna Genesis, compare the lectures The Contribution of Jewish Studies to the Research on Early Christian art, The Influence of Jewish painting of early Christian Art, Christian-Jewish Encounters in Art suggesting that there existed Jewish book illumination in late antiquity.

 

Mosaic floors in the synagogues of Hammat Tiberias and Beth Alpha. In one inscription the Synagogue of Hammat Tiberias, among others, is called a ‘holy place’. One of the representations shows the temple objects, which suggests the holy character of the temple. This refers to the eschatological temple. Next to it there is a zodiac, which represents the yearly cycle, as ordained by God.

 

Jewish art of late antiquity ceases to exist towards the end of the sixth century due to apparent objections to images within a movement of withdrawal within Judaism, and under the influence of the Byzantine iconoclastic controversy.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:524560


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Jewish Art in Late Antiquity

Siehe:

Jüdische Kunst der Antike phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472616

Jüdische Symbolik in der Kunst phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472713

The Continuation of Ancient Jewish Art in the Middle Ages phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:475054

Das Problem einer jüdischen Kunst phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:475084


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Jewish Background to the Representation of the Giving of the Law on Sinai in Christian manuscripts

There are two strands in which Christian iconographic conventions can be brought in conjunction with Jewish tradition through parallels in late antique Jewish art, for instance the Synagogue of Dura Europos, and the influence of Rabbinic Bible exegesis, Midrash literature.

 

The giving of the law on Sinai and the reading of the law in the Carolingian Bibles of Grandval Moutier and San Paolo Fuori le Mura from the 9th century.

 

In two superimposed registers there are scenes that combine various elements from the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy.

 

Summary of the suggestions made by Schmid, Köhler, Gaehde, Kessler. Kessler showed the parallels between a representation of the Giving of the Law and an old English Aelfric Paraphrase, which, according to some scholars is based on an early Christian model (see Pächt). Another particularly close connection exists between these and the Bible in San Isidoro, Leon, 960.

 

The reading of the Law appears also in the Catalan Roda Bible, 11th century.

 

Another parallel can be found in the Ashburnham Pentateuch, 7th century [now to be dated to the sixth century]

 

The recitation of the Law in the Tabernacle is what these representations all have in common. Rabbinic traditions assume the transmission of the law both on Mount Sinai, and in the Tabernacle.

 

The Rabbinic tradition also equates the Tabernacle and the Temple (a similar understanding results from the fact that in the Synagogue of Dura Europos the Tabernacle is seen as a built temple).

 

The mentioned Bible from Castile, now in San Isidoro in Leon also illustrates a representation of the interior of the tabernacle with the temple implements. The tabernacle also appears here as a built temple. This representation, also seen in other Castilian Bibles, in turn connects with Sephardi-Hebrew book art, in which representations of temple objects were particularly popular (Bible from the South of France, from Florence, the Sephardic Bible in Milan, 14th century.

 

It is therefore possible to assume that the Castilian Bibles are based on earlier Jewish models.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:524559


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Jewish Baroque Illustrations in 18th century Austrian manuscripts (Lecture cycle 21.11.1996)

The roots of the tradition of Jewish Baroque manuscripts are to be found in the Bohemian-Moravian-Hungarian region. From thence the tradition passes through Vienna, Hamburg-Altona and into the Rhineland.

 

The earliest workshop was possibly in Leipnik, Moravia

 

Several possible reasons for the development of such a tradition: 1) as the Jewish religion includes hand written documents, such as the Torah Rolls, the profession of the scribe continues to live on after the invention of book printing. Torah scribes search for further sources of income; 2) economic upswing of Jewish families after the Spanish war of Succession and the Seven Year War.

 

Workshop in Trebitsch with old tradition: Arye Judah Loebh Kahane was from Trebitsch, worked in Vienna and later in Bavaria

 

Siddur for Simon Wolf, son of Daniel Oppenheim (Bodleian Mic. 9340)

 

Siddur for an unknown commissioner in Vienna (about 1720, BL, Add. 17867) with text expressing the hope that Emperor Karl VI will bring the Israelites to safety. This text is accompanied by a selection of Biblical scenes, whose iconography is borrowed from printed Hebrew books

 

Siddur from 1720

 

Prayer book from 1730 (Braunschweig Landesmuseum)

 

Moshe ben Wolf from Trebitsch and active in Trebitsch. Moshe left several Haggadot, which confer some of the Amsterdam Haggadah iconography to the medium of painting.

 

Haggadah from 1716/17

 

Van Geldern Haggadah, 1723 for the court Jew Eliezer ben Josef from Düsseldorf (Lazarus van Geldern)

 

Haggadah in Cincinnati (HUC MS 441), 1717 – with a representation of a Seder table reminiscent of the style of panel painting

 

Meshullam Zemel active in Vienna

 

Haggadah from 1719 for Nathan, Son of Isaac Oppenheim from Vienna (NNL 805573)

 

Shabbat prayer book (Bodl. Mich 4259) for a son-in-law of Isaac Oppenheim with a Kabbalistic Shabbat ritual. The tinted pen drawings are influenced by copper engravings.

 

Shabbat Order (BL Add. 8881): Illustration of several realia, borrowed from upper-class Christian society.

 

Dedication pages for the imperial couple (1732 and 1733, ÖNB cod. Hebr. 233, 234)

 

Aaron Wolf Schreiber Herlingen from Gewitsch, Moravia, active in Vienna

 

Birqat mazon from 1724 (NY ?, 8232) with several blessings for various holy days and everyday situations.

 

Haggadah from 1728 (Sotheby catalogue, Tel Aviv 1.10. 1991)

 

Collection of Psalms from 1735 (Frankfurt/Main, Stadtbibliothek, Ms hebr. Oct 14)

 

Latin Psalter for an archduke 1739.

 

Washed pen and ink drawings from a Haggadah 1749–52 (NY Mic. 4477) – strong conformity with the Amsterdam Haggadahh (in the iconography, as well as in the attempt to imitate the copper engraving technique)

 

Birqat hamazon from 1728 (Copenhagen, hebr. 32) from Nikolsburg, seat of the country Rabbi from Moravia

 

Micrography: Micrographic representation of Maria Theresia (lost); micrographic version of the five Megillot (1733–48)

 

Nathan ben Shimshon from Meseritz, active ca. 1720-1740

 

Passover Haggadot according to the model of the Amsterdam Haggadah (Jerusalem, NNL, cod. 2237)

 

Psalter with pen and ink drawings (Jerusalem, NNL, cod. 80987

 

Hayim ben Asher Anshel, Kittsee, Pressburg and Wien, active between 1741 und 1782, mainly in in Kittsee. Most of the manuscripts merely contain flower ornaments in the Rococo style.

 

Passover Haggadah from 1748 (Jerusalem, Israel Museum, cod. 181/53): Copy of the Amsterdam copper engravings with some motifs from the Venetian wood cuts Haggadah.

 

Josef ben David from Leipnik, Moravia: during the first half of the 18th century traceable in several places, finally settles in Altona. Figurative representations, reflecting the taste of the Baroque culture: Haggadah of Moses Freudenberg (New York, JTS Mic 446) from 1732; Haggadah from Darmstadt (New York, JTS Mic 8253) from 1733; Haggadah from Altona (Amsterdam, Rosenthaliana, MS 383) from 1738.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525994

 


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Jewish Baroque Painting of the 18th Century in Bohemian-Moravian-Austrian-Hungarian Border Region, City of Schlaining, September 1990

Siehe:

Jüdische Barockmalerei phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484


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Jewish Book Art in the Renaissance and Baroque Periods

Siehe:

Illuminierte und künstlerisch interessante Bibeldrucke

phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474422

Jüdische Barockmalerei phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484


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Jewish Christian Encounter in Art (Israel 1987, Amerika 1989, Spanien 1990) – Teil 1

Late Antiquity: corresponds to phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472253

 

Middle Ages: further observations of rabbinic elements in medieval art. These were worked on with the same methodology: Aelfric Paraphrase (=Old English Hexateuch), 11th century. Pamplona Bibles, around 1300, Navarra and later copies of the same; Byzantine Octateuch manuscripts; Koberg Bible, Nurnberg 1483; Pierpont Morgan Library, Psalter, MS 724

 

Connections to early Christian art on the one hand and to medieval Jewish book illumination on the other

 

Christian images of the Discovery of Moses showing Pharaoh’s daughter naked, following the model of Dura Europos

 

Parallel representations also appear in Sephardi Haggadot: Golden Haggadah, fol. 9r; BL, Or. 2884, 12r; Kaufmann Haggadah, p. 10; Castellazzo Bible.

 

Furnishing of the Torah shrine in the Synagogue of Dura Europos: theme of the temple, the sacrifice of Abraham, middle section repeatedly painted over. It deals with a messianic representation of the theophany with two Moses scenes to the left and right: the thorn bush and Mount Sinai.

 

Analogous theophany programmes appear in the Moses Basilica on Sinai, as well as in San Vitale, Ravenna, both from the 6th c.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525998


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Jewish Christian Encounter in Art (Israel 1987, Amerika 1989, Spanien 1990) – Teil 2

See: Christian-Jewish Encounters in art. phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472218

 

Ashkenazi Mahzorim: Representations of the couple from the Song of Songs (Leipzig Mahzor) – compared to the Gothic images of the veiled personification of the Synagoga (Strasbourg)

 

Carolingian Bibles, 9th c. Grandval Bible, London; Vivian Bible (Second Bible of Charles the Bald), Paris; Bible in San Paolo fuori le mura- Moses on Mount Sinai and the reading of the law. The reading takes place in a temple-like building. This can be linked to the Rabbinic tradition.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:526505

 


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Jewish Festivals in the Liturgical Year (Religion Teachers Conference Landeck 1987)

Introduction to the main Jewish Festivals: in the Bible the three most important obligatory holy days Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot (festival of weeks) can be traced back to agricultural festivals: the first grain harvest, the first wheat harvest and thanksgiving festival.

 

In the Israelite context these three festivals were pilgrimage festivals to the temple in Jerusalem.

 

Later these festivals were linked to Biblical events. Passover: the exodus from Egypt; Shavuot: The presentation of the law; Sukkot: wandering through the desert.

 

The earliest recorded prayer books are those of Amram Gaon, 9th century, of Saadia Gaon of the 10th century and in the 11th century the Mahzor Vitry of Simcha ben Samuel, a student of Rashi, Mishneh Torah of Maimonides, 12th century.

 

Siddur: Statutory prayers

 

Mahzor: liturgical hymns (piyutim not obligatory); brief history of the tradition of piyut poetry and the most important poets. Most of the Mahzorim come in two volumes: Spring and Autumn.

 

In the 13th century a rich tradition of illuminated Mahzorim began in southern Germany. This tradition later moved on to Italy.

 

Special Shabbatot before Passover: Sheqalim (Contribution for the building of the Temple: Oxford – Michael Mahzor, Jerusalem – Worms Mahzor, Leipzig Mahzor); Zakhor (Amalekites: Oxford – Laud Mahzor); Purim (Story of Esther: Oxford – Laud Mahzor, Leipzig Mahzor); Para (The High Priest slaughters the red cow: Oxford – Laud Mahzor); Hodesh (New Moon before Passover: Oxford – Laud Mahzor, Leipzig Mahzor)

 

The So-Called Great Shabbat: the piyut ties in with the Song of Songs and the illustration shows the love of God for His people as demonstrated in the depiction of a couple (Laud Mahzor, Leipzig Mahzor, Hamburger Siddur – Levy 37). The image in the Hamburger Siddur shows the bride with veiled eyes, recalling the Christian representations of the Synagogue (Tournai Cathedral, approx. 1250).

 

Passover: brief background information on the Passover Haggadah, which is not part of the Mahzor. Some of the Passover topics belonging to the Mahzor are: the cleaning of the kitchen vessels, the preparation of the Mazot, the Egyptians’ persecution of the Israelites (Leipzig Mahzor, Darmstadt Mahzor); Zodiac Signs (some accompanied by labours of the month) as an illustration of the prayers for dew in spring and rain in autumn: Michael Mahzor, Worms Mahzor, Leizpig Mahzor

 

The Ashkenazi Passover Haggadot usually contain a richer programme of ritual scenes, such as the images from the Second Nurnberg Haggadah (London, Sofer Collection) and the closely related Yahuda Haggada (Israel Museum). Here one can see the Search for leaven, the preparation of Mazot, the recitation of ‘This is the Bread of Affliction’, the seder table, the questions of the youngest son, the four questioning sons (Parma Haggada), Jacob goes to Egypt, slavery (the Bird’s Head Haggadah), the plagues, the Exodus from Egypt, Rabban Gamliel, Matza, Maror, Afikoman, the new Jerusalem.

 

The illustration cycles of the medieval Passover Haggadot have four main points: ritual themes, themes relevant to the texts, biblical and eschatological themes

 

Shavuot: The presentation of the Law on Sinai (Laud Mahzor, Mahzor in three volumes) A lovely hind and a graceful doe (Mahzor Worms) 

 

Autumn Holy Days, see the lecture: The Great Holy Days in the medieval Mahzorim Illustration phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472552

 

Hanukkah: Festival of Lights: Darmstadt Mahzor- High Priest lights the Menorah.

 

Further Information about the Festivals in Kurt Schubert: Religion des Judentums, p. 137-142.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525988


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