Kurt und Ursula Schubert Archiv


Search Results:

Foto: Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrum für Jüdische Studien an der Palacký Universität Olmütz im Frühjahr 2014.

Diese Aufnahme wurde im Frühjahr 2014, anlässlich eines Besuches der Tochter und Enkelin von Kurt und Ursula Schubert, aufgenommen und zeigt das Team des Kurt und Ursula Schubert Zentrums für Jüdische Studien an der Palacky Universität Olmütz.

Hinten, stehend, von links nach rechts: Mgr. Ivana Cahova, Head of the Department (mit Sohn); PhDr. Lenka Ulicna, PhD., Assistant; Prof. Ingeborg Fialova (Professorin für Germanistik und Initiatorin der Olmützer Judaistik); Mag. Louise Hecht, PhD., Assistant; Eva Schubert (Tochter von Kurt und Ursula Schubert).

Vorne, hockend bzw. sitzend, von links nach rechts: Doc. Tamas Visi, M.A., Guarantor of the Jewish and Israeli Studies Study Field; Franziska Wibmer mit Tochter Laura (Enkelin und Urenkelin von Kurt und Ursula Schubert); Mgr. Ivana Cahova, Head of the Department (mit Sohn)

 


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

From Antagonism to Ecumenism

With this collection of keywords Professor Kurt Schubert illustrates anti-Judaism in Antiquity and then shows the beginnings of Jewish-Christian co-operation in the modern age.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

From Antagonism to Ecumenism as seen in art

The following topics are discussed:

Controversy dating back to late antiquity – both in theology and in legislation (Codex Theodosianus)

Agobard of Lyon (in the years around 820) – ideal of a purely Christian society

1096 – persecutions in the Rhineland during the first crusade

1240- 48: Parisian Talmud Trial

Accusations of desecration of the hosts and ritual murder

Economic marginalisation of the Jews because of restrictions on the pawn broking business

Around 1300 – eviction of Jews from France and England

year of the Plague: Accusation of poisoning the wells

Expulsion of Jews from many of the imperial cities in the 15th c.

In the Carolingian kingdom Christian-Jewish controversy can be seen in imagery from the 9th century onwards. The monopoly of Jews in international trade.

First representation of Ecclesia und Synagoga – Drogo Sacramentary (around 830, Judaism shown as a bearded old man); Carolingian ivory crucifixion scenes (Synagoga turning away)

The theme of Ecclesia and Synagoga is also familiar from Byzantine art (Paris, BnF, gr. 74)

Uta Codex (1000-1025) – Synagoga with covered eyes

Gunhild of Denmark’s cross – 1050–1075

Apsis arch, Spentrup (Denmark), circa 1200- Synagoga stabs the Agnus Dei

Liber Floridus belonging to Lambert of St. Omer – circa. 1120

Wilten Paten, 1160–70: Synagoga at the gates of hell

Augsburg Psalter, 13th c. Jews’ Descent into Hell. In Christian scenes of the Last Judgement Jews are always seen on the side of hell

Hortus Deliciarum of the Herrade of Landsberg: Hell with a special section for the Jews

Sacramentary of Tours – 12th c. – Unveiling of Synagoga

Chartres Cathedral– Beginning of the 13th. c.: Ecclesia and Synagoga – the blindness (veiling of the eyes) is no longer temporary, now a devil shoots an arrow into the eyes of Synagoga, and the blindness can no longer be cured.

Last Judgement scenes on the tympanum of the Bourges Cathedral – devil with a ‘typically Jewish’ physiognomy

Pöhlde Monastery choir stalls (1284) and Erfurt (ca. 1400) – defamatory motifs: ram’s head, Jewish swine

The Thörl Maglern ‘living cross’– 1485–89: God’s hand smiting Synagoga with a sword

Anti-Jewish iconography in Passions –and crucifixion scenes: Psalter from Liège (Pilate with a Jew’s hat and therefore identified as a Jew); Psalter from Constance (Roman soldiers clearly depicted as Jews)

Caricature representations: –Salisbury Breviary (ca. 1280) – High Priests and members of the Sanhedrin with devilish grimaces

 

Iconography of the Jew’s hat – can also be interpreted neutrally and appears in Hebrew manuscripts (Bird’s Head Haggadah)

 

‘Judensau’: The motif probably goes back to the custom of Jewish oath, as seen in the

Schwabenspiegel; for the oath Jews had to stand on a bleeding swine skin. Uppsala (14th c.); this motif can be seen on many prints from the 16th century onwards.

 

Anti-Christian polemics in Jewish culture: Motif of the Pharaoh’s bloodbath (in the blood of the Israelite children) from the Midrash as a means of addressing anti-Jewish persecution and as an ‘answer’ to accusations of ritual murder (Second Nurnberg Haggadah, 15th c., Venetian Haggadah, 1609, Abraham from Ihringen in Alsace, 18th c.)

Italian Psalter in Parma: Illustration for Psalm 83 – a monk preaching about the extermination of the Jews to three men carrying lances (13th c.)

London, British Library, Add. 14761 – Sephardi Haggadah (14th c.): Marginal illustrations show a dog serving a rabbit; in the Last Days the persecutor becomes a servant.

Ryland Haggadah (now in Manchester, 14th c.): hunting motif with Dalmatian dogs (in black and white) as persecutors of Judaism. The dogs allude to the Dominican Order (Dominicans as domini canes in the fight against unbelief and hereticism)

Hunting motif as an allegory of persecution: Second Nurnberg Haggadah – Esau (representing Christianity) as hunter; Mahzor Worms, hunter with a devil’s grimace and rooster feet of demons

Wood block series with representations of the purported ritual murder of Simon of Trent, 15th c.

Modern contention with persecution, ecumenism: Marc Chagall: image of the Crucified as an expression of Jewish suffering

Ernst de Gaspari, Eggenburg, Lower Austria, Focus on ecumenism and the Shoah

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:526507


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

From Apologetics to Polemics to Dialogue

In these notes Professor Kurt Schubert illustrates the history of the relationship between Christianity and Judaism, with emphasis on the development of Christianity and the origins of anti-Jewish positions.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

From Misunderstanding to Understanding onto Agreement

Here Professor Kurt Schubert describes the history of Christian Anti-Judaism and Anti-Semitism from the beginning of Christianity up until the modern era. Literature references are supplied.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Fundamental Questions of Messianology and Christology

Professor Kurt Schubert’s collection of materials deals with the subject of the Messiah from Antiquity to the modern age and examines the various positions and messianic figures in Christianity and Judaism. Attached was the passage from Isaiah 8, 14-9,6.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Geburtstag Kurt Schubert

Kurt Schubert an seinem achtzigsten Geburtstag im März 2003 beim Friseurmüller in Neustift am Walde; links von Prof. Schubert, Prof. Günther Stemberger


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Gola and Identity

In this E-book one can find notes for the intended publication on Jewish identity in the Diaspora. It had originally meant to be from Antiquity until the modern age, but the notes do not refer to all the intended points and the numbering does not correspond. Yet it does give extensive historical and text-based information for the points mentioned.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Haggada

Summary of the main aspects of the preparations: Cleansing of all that is leavened, laying of the Seder table with an egg, bones, Charoset, four beakers of wine, Matzah, Maror (the bitter herbs), Karpas and salt water

 

The order of the Seder: Kiddush, hand washing, breaking of the Matzah, bread of the poor, asking the youngest son, asking the four sons, reading of the Passover Midrash, Mentioning and quoting several Rabbis, eating of the Matzah and the Maror, flour, Hallel, Pour Out Your Wrath, eschatological perspective, Passover songs

 

The following pages contain a copy of the Haggadah text with German translation

 

For more information of the Passover festival, see Jakob Allerhand, in Judentum im Mittelalter, (Judaism in the Middle Ages), Austr.-Kat. Halbturn 1975.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:556131


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Hebrew Illuminated Manuscripts from Burgenland in the 18th and 19th Century

Siehe:

Jüdische Barockillustrationen in österreichischen Handschriften des 18. Jhts. phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484

Jüdische Buchkunst in Renaissance und Barock phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474553

Jüdische Buchkunst in Renaissance und Barock phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474553


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

History of Austrian Judaism

Professor Kurt Schubert completed The History of Austrian Judaism shortly before dying, but the work was not published until 2008, after his death.

The book begins with the origins of Austrian Judaism and takes a brief look at Roman Antiquity and then at the developments of medieval Jewish communities from the modern era to the present day. Several chapters are dedicated to the Shoah, as well as to the post-War period. The work is based on his decade long lecture series on the introduction to the history of Austrian Judaism, which can be found on the Phaidra Platform: phaidra.univie.ac.at/o:426683

The remarkable list of sources and literature references provide a deep insight into Professor Schubert’s working methods.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Identity Problems in Austrian Judaism

In this text Professor Kurt Schubert sketches the main lines of Jewish history in Austria from the Enlightenment until the present day, laying special emphasis on the various trends within the fields of identity and belonging in Judaism.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Illuminated Manuscripts and Jewish Artists (Joseftaler Pastoral Care week, Bavaria 1990)

Short overview of the approaches to Jewish pictorial art in late Antiquity: monumental art in the Middle East

 

6th Century: Sudden breaking off of figurative painting, related to a new “national” awareness (giving up the Greek language in favour of Hebrew in the religious service); Reverting back to the Biblical prohibition of images, as well as the destruction of artistic evidence. Additionally, Islam’s hostility towards images also affects the Jewish culture.

 

New approaches follow in the 13th century in the West, where a rich tradition of book art exists. This was primarily exercised in convents, with a shift towards urban lay workshops occurring in around 1200.

 

Jewish interest in manuscript painting repeatedly meets with criticism from Rabbinic authorities. Joseph the Zealot (Hameqanne), France, mid 13th century. His interpretation of the prohibition of images may have contributed to the fact that in Jewish art animal heads often replaced human ones, or that the faces were covered (only in the region of what is now Germany).

 

Among the earliest evidence of Ashkenazi book art one can find the Ashkenazi Bible in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana (see lecture Bible Images in Judaism): Genesis Initials/the Fall): Adam and Eva are seen with covered faces, and from behind. At the end of the Pentateuch there are more detailed representations of the Book of Ruth, as well as of the Just at the last meal (eating of the Messianic animals Behemot, Leviathan and Zit corresponds to the alphabet of the Rabbi Aqiba) and finally a picture of the seven heavenly spheres with the four creatures from the book Ezekiel (corresponds to the imagery of late antiquity Merkabah literature.

 

Rashi Commentary in Munich: the oldest dated manuscript with illustrations, Würzburg 1233 (visit of the three angels to Abraham), the iconography of this Rashi commentary is a typical, as otherwise only sketches of the temple plan are to be found in these texts.

 

In Iberia on the other hand, figural representations were almost completely abstained from, probably under the influence of Islamic culture. The so-called Cervera Bible (Lisbon) 1299-1300 is an exception. Its illuminator is named in a colophon of his own: Josef the French: Zacharia’s vision in an unusual representation: Jonas’s ship journey (with human figures).

 

During the 15th century the Cervera Bible was preserved in La Coruña, Galicia, where in 1476 it was used as a model for the making of the first Kennikott Bible. This was illuminated by Josef, ibn Chayyim.

 

Passover Haggadot are known both in the Ashkenazi and in the Sephardi traditions. The earliest Ashkenazi Bible comes from around 1300 from Southern Germany, perhaps Würzburg and is known as the Bird’s Head Haggadah (Israel Museum), see lectures Jewish Book Illumination in Germany, slide 1, 2, 3. In the Ashkenazi Haggadot illustrations appear unframed and in the margins.

 

In the Sephardi Haggadot however, there is a continuous biblical cycle, which does not directly connect to the Haggada text: Golden Haggadah (British Library); the Bible scenes are sometimes enriched with elements from commentary literature (Midrash) (the story of Noah, the tower of Babel with a representation of the builders killing each other, a legend originating in the Genesis Rabba, Abraham in the fiery furnace.

 

Coburg Pentateuch from Coburg, first half of the 15th century. At the end of the book of Leviticus there is the image of a teacher and his student within an intricate architectural setting. This is the oldest representation of the Coburg Fortress.

 

The most interesting scribe and painter to be known by name was Joel ben Simeon, originally from the Rhineland, who moved to Italy in the middle of the century. His life story can be reconstructed with the help of about twenty manuscripts, among which there are particularly many Haggadot. Of special interest is the so-called London Haggada (BL, Add. 14762) from around 1460. The departure of the children of Israel from Egypt and their persecution by the Pharaoh’s army clearly shows how much Joel had adopted the style of Italian painting.

 

Contemplating Joel’s work leads us to early modern book printing. Of particular interest is the signed copy of a picture Bible with woodcuts for the whole Pentateuch. The original has not been preserved, but can be ascribed to the Venetian artist Moses dal Castellazzo. Dal Castellazzo used a great variety of models of both Christian and Jewish origin. Many of his pictures use Jewish legends.

 

The oldest Ashkenazi Passover Haggada was printed in 1526 in Prague by Gerschon Kohen. It was followed by the so-called Mantua Haggada in 1560 and the Venetian Haggada in 1609. In the 17th century the Amsterdam Haggada was printed, the city becoming a new centre for Jewish book printing. Whereas the older printed Haggadot were endowed with woodcuts, the Amsterdam Haggada now had a series of copper engravings. It was produced by a convert, a former priest, who used the models by Matthew Merian.

 

In the 18th century a new tradition arose of handwritten and painted Passover Haggadot commissioned by court Jews. The writers and painters came mainly from Vienna and Moravia. Among the most important were Josef ben David from Leibnitz, who was able to gain a large clientele from the many German cities. Echoes of this tradition can be followed all the way up to to Northern Germany, to Altona.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525990


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Illuminated Prints and Bible Prints of Artistic Interest

Two Parts:

1) Overview of the difficulties early Hebrew book printing met with in the different European regions

2) Illuminated Manuscripts from the Baroque period phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484

 

 

Part 1: Overview of the difficulties with early Hebrew book printing

 

In what is now Germany it was not allowed to establish Jewish printing workshops

 

The earliest workshops were set up in Italy: Reggio Calabria (1475); Piove di Sacco (1475); Mantua (1476-77)

 

The craft of Hebrew printing arose out of the scribe’s craft

 

Soncino Family: from Soncino near Cremona: the first completely printed Hebrew Bible (1485-88); the halakhic works. Wood cut frames as decoration

 

Moses dal Castellazzo: The portrait painter of the Sforza family in Milan and Gonzaga family in Mantua produces a block book picture Bible, of which only fragments have survived, along with a manuscript copy. The picture templates are from Christian picture Bibles, Jewish manuscripts and early Christian prints.

 

Two printed Haggadot with wood cut pictures from the 16th century have been preserved: The Prague Haggadah, 1526; Mantua Haggadah, 1560, followed by the Venetian Haggadah in the early 17th century (1609) and the Amsterdam Haggadah with copper engraving in 1695, using a series of images from Matthew of Merian as models.

 

Part 2: Illuminated Manuscripts from the Baroque Period phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:474484

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525993


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Illumination in medieval Germany

Short sketch of the history of Ashkenazi Judaism

 

Late Antiquity approaches to figurative Jewish painting, since the 6th century reversion to the Jewish prohibition of images

 

In what was later Germany very large Bibles are popular among Christians. The early Hebrew manuscript production reflects this trend.

 

Christian illumination of books was practised in lay, urban workshops from the 13th century onwards, thus making it easy for Jews to have access to models. Christian books are used as pawns at Jewish money lenders.

 

The Jewish prohibition of images and the disagreements about the human figure (see lecture Bible Images in Judaism): polemics against figurative images from the side of Rabbinic authorities

 

One of the earliest examples of Ashkenazi manuscript tradition is the Ashkenazi Bible in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana (see Lecture Bible Images in Judaism), The Genesis Initials (The Fall): Adam and Eva are seen with covered faces and from behind. At the end of the Pentateuch there are more extensive illustrations on the book of Ruth, as well of the Righteous at the messianic banquet (eating of the Messianic animals Behemot, Leviathan and Ziz).

 

Rashi Commentary in Munich: the oldest dated manuscript with illustrations, Würzburg 1233 (Visit of the three Angels to Abraham). The iconography of this Rashi Commentary is atypical, as otherwise only sketches of the temple plan are to be found in these texts.

 

Regensburg Pentateuch (see Bible Images in Judaism). The giving of the Torah on Sinai. The mountain is put over the people like a bucket, an image that can be traced back to Rabbinic commentaries. The story of Esther, of Job, the temple objects (Aaron in the clothes of the High Priest lighting the Menorah).

 

Question of whether the Regensburg Pentateuch was illuminated by Christian or Jewish painters (Robert Suckale). The close relationship to Rabbinic commentary suggests the latter.

 

Micrography (massora figurata): especially popular in the German lands Schubert thinks that micrography also has to do with the bypassing of prohibition of images. Vatican Bible with micrographic hunting scene; Pentateuch in London

 

A collection of Mahzor manuscripts:

 

Worms Mahzor from Würzburg (1272, Representation of the Great Shabbat with the motif of Godly love seen as a couple)

 

In addition to Passover, there is also a representation of the Seder meal (Worms Mahzor, Dresden Mahzor).

 

Representation of the Shavuot in the Dresden Mahzor and the Worms Mahzor

 

Leipzig Mahzor: the preparation of the Matzah and the persecution of the Israelites for the Passover liturgy, The giving of the Torah for Shavuot, the Shofar blower and the Binding of Isaac for the New Year’s Festival, Abraham in the fiery furnace of Nimrod at Yom Kippur

 

 

The workshop of the scribe Hayyim on the Upper Rhine: The Schocken Bible, Tripartite Mahzor, Pentateuch of the Duke of Sussex

 

Codex of the Christian Hebraist Reuchlin (15th century)

 

De Castro Pentateuch

 

Coburg Pentateuch (considerations on whether this manuscript originates from Coburg)

 

Ashkenazi Haggadot: The Bird’s Head Haggadah (conceivably copied by the same scribe as the Leipzig Mahzor) with different ritual representations: the Seder meal, the bread of affliction, the eating of the bitter herbs, scenes related to the text, Biblical texts: the persecution of the Israelites by the Egyptians (these carry a flag with the Habsburg eagle, possibly an allusion to the persecution of Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg by Rudolf von Habsburg).

 

Later Haggadot such as the Second Nurnberg Haggadah and the Yahuda Haggadah contain especially extensive cycles (the preparation of the Matzot, the cleaning of leavened foods, the bread of affliction; extensive series of Biblical scenes following the Bible text chronologically. These illustrations are indebted to Rabbinic Commentaries (for instance Joseph as the Pharaoh’s viceroy riding on a horse, the childhood story of Moses, where the Pharaoh’s daughter is seen with a supernaturally outstretched arm; Zipporah cares for Moses in captivity; the saving of Moses from death on the way to Egypt and the circumcision of his son). The embedding of these scenes in Midrash literature possibly refers to earlier Jewish models (reference to David Kaufmann, who observes that Johann Christoph Wagenseil had seen a fragment of a Jewish illustrated manuscript).

 

These Haggadah illustrations serve for the edification and entertainment of women and children during the reading of the Haggadah at the Seder meal.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:525989


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Illustrations for Ursula Schubert's lecture: Haggada

Related text material: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472602

 

This resource was compiled by the Center for Jewish Art at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and is based on the "Ursula and Kurt Schubert Archives for Hebrew Illustrated Manuscripts". It provides links to some of the scenes discussed in the Urusla Schubert material. If relevant images are available in the Archives, the resource contains the corresponding link.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Illustrations for Ursula Schubert's lecture: Three Lectures at the Humboldt University, Berlin

Related text material: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472446

 

This resource was compiled by the Center for Jewish Art at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and is based on the "Ursula and Kurt Schubert Archives for Hebrew Illustrated Manuscripts". It provides links to some of the scenes discussed in the Urusla Schubert material. If relevant images are available in the Archives, the resource contains the corresponding link.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Inauguration of the Student House in Floridsdorf 1969

Kurt Schubert, Second from the right, seated


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Influence of Jewish painting on early Christian art

The question of the influence of Jewish painting on early Christian art (see also Christian-Jewish Encounters in Art phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:472218) became particularly relevant with the discovery of the Dura Europos Synagogue and its murals (244 AD)

 

Previously most scholars assumed that the Jewish prohibition of images prevent figural art in a Jewish context

 

Biblical descriptions of the artistic elements of the Temple (such as the Brazen Sea and the Cherubs)

 

Illuminated Hebrew manuscripts and their pictorial ornamentation draws on late antique models

 

Rabbinic texts dealing with the question of representative art lead to the supposition that the murals in Dura Europos were not a unique case

 

Assumption that Jewish art harks back to the second century and originated in the metropoles where Jews met with Hellenistic culture (Antiochia)

 

Observation that some of the picture themes of the Synagogue recur later in Christian art, although it must be recalled that the Synagogue itself only existed for eleven years in this form

 

Some of the image formulations are not composed monumentally, but seem rather to be borrowed from the small medium of text illustration

 

Catacomb of the Via Latina (4th century) with numerous biblical (Old Testament) representations: in strong contrast to other catacomb paintings which concentrate on salvation scenes; these are connected to the liturgy of the dead

 

The painting of the catacomb of the Via Latina on the other hand are of a much more narrative nature; they are more diverse and present iconographic elements borrowed from Jewish Biblical exegesis (Midrash literature). The compositions of some of these images are reminiscent of the Synagogue of Dura Europos (Jacob’s dream in Bethel). Yet they reappear in Christian art (Antependium of Salerno, Jacob’s dream in Bethel, circa 1100; Mosaics in the Monreale Cathedral in Sicily, end of the 12th century, Alba Bible, Castile, 15th century)

 

Hiding and discovery of the infant Moses in the Dura Europos Synagogue compared with the catacomb of the Via Latina: two different picture formulations have been preserved, both derived from Jewish Bible interpretation. The iconography of the Synagogue additionally uses Hellenistic pictorial language

 

Parallels of this order of scenes can be found later in the Ashburnham Pentateuch (6th century); in the Byzantine Octateuch manuscripts, for instance Vatican, gr. 746 and 747 (11th century)

 

Echoes of this iconography later appear in Haggadah illustration (Golden Haggadah, Finding of the infant Moses, circa 1320)

 

Exodus from Egypt and Crossing through the Sea of Reeds, Dura Europos Synagogue compared to the Crossing through the Sea of Reeds in the catacomb of the Via Latina

 

Particular interpretation difficulties in the illustration of the Israelites on Sinai in the Via Latina Catacomb. Interpretation attempt with the aid of Rabbinic exegesis equating Sinai as the place of God’s revelation with the Temple Mount. In the Sinai scene one can see a Temple building; this scene was used again in another catacomb cubiculum, where the original content of the picture was no longer understood however and the iconography shifted to one of the resurrection of Lazarus and the Temple building interpreted as a grave

 

Later Christian comparison samples: Israelites on Sinai on a mural in the Necropolis of el- Bagawat, Upper Egypt, 4th Century; Byzantine manuscripts, for instance vat.gr.reg.1.; Ashburnham Pentateuch; Carolingian Bible of Grandval Moutier, 9th century.

 

(Translator: Joan Avery)

 

The Corresponding illustrations, selected by the Center of Jewish Art (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), can be found here: phaidra.univie.ac.at/detail_object/o:524557


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

Interview: Ein gemeinsames Lebenswerk. Ein Gespräch mit dem Ehepaar Ursula und Kurt Schubert

Dieses Interview mit Professor Kurt Schubert und seiner Frau Doktorin Ursula Schubert wurde in der Nummer 42 der Zeitschrift „David“ 1999 veröffentlicht. Das Wissenschaftlerehepaar spricht über seinen biografischen Werdegang, sowie über die im Laufe ihrer Karrieren vorgenommene Forschung.


License

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

No Results